Regine Allison Claire: Author of YA Fiction

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Release Day! “A Place Where I Belong” Flash Anthology with My Story “Words Needed”

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Do sit back and relax for a spell.
Three tales from Spirit I have to tell.
Moving ahead from lives felt wrong.
Finally found—a place to belong.

 

Words Needed by Regine Allison Claire

Tess: teenager, studious, voracious reader, and in her high school, she couldn’t be more of a misfit. It’s not just a social label; it’s frustrating and isolating. Is she too “weird” to belong anywhere?

When her love of fantasy literature and history collide in an assignment, she gets more answers than she could have ever expected.

With a single word, she will find acceptance.

 

Power Walking by TJ Burns

When Leda’s recent heartbreak leaves her sleepless and depressed, she begins a new ritual of taking late-night walks. One evening her midnight wanderings reveal a sight that both frightens and intrigues her.

Is the shrouded circle of women a figment of Leda’s exhausted mind, or are they the gatekeepers on her path to empowerment?

 

Home by Jamie White

Julie has always been curious about her family’s spiritual path, but she’s never been allowed to take part in their traditions because of her age. Now that she’s reached adulthood, she must decide whether to dedicate herself to their path, or forge her own.

 

 

Available as an eBook from the following retailers:

Buy now from Amazon (US)
Buy now from Amazon (Canada)
Buy now from Amazon (UK)

Buy now from Smashwords

Also on Goodreads

 

 


Writer’s Resource: Giants, Monsters, and Dragons (Carol Rose)

 

Encyclopedia of monsters2

Giants, Monsters, and Dragons:
an encyclopedia of folklore, legend, and myth

Carol Rose (2000)

Buy @ Amazon

 

What lay within the bounds of human knowledge and was relatively familiar could be reasonably and comfortably accommodated, no matter what its size. But that which lay outside the bounds of human knowledge was monstrous and awesome. Explanations for the chaotic, precreation nature of the world and the universe, the vast fissures, the threatening geographical features of the earth, the unexplored regions, and the disappearance or transformation of those who ventured into the unknown were accommodated in the concepts of the monstrous. Those beings that existed beyond the human realms of order were the constant threat that challenged the human world and had to be appeased, controlled, banished, or defeated.

– Carol Rose, “Giants, Monsters, and Dragons” (2000), pg xxv

 

I can’t remember when exactly I got this book, or from where, but it’s been sitting on my shelf for a few years. My partner says I received it as part of my Children’s Literature class when I was in university, which isn’t impossible since I received a huge box of books for that one class alone!

In any event, I finally pulled it out to consult it. Originally, I was looking to get some ideas for one of the flash fiction stories I’m working on, Shift. The intention was to obtain a little extra information on werewolves. While I found it, there was more. I came out with the idea to explore the ideas of a were-bear in another flash fiction story, Burden.

And then I couldn’t stop looking. It’s been hanging around my desk while I’ve been working on these short stories and every couple of days, I can’t help but pick it up and skim over it.

I love this book.

Other than discovering that “were-bears” are a thing (despite the fact that I giggle because it’s way too close to sounding like Care Bears), this book is packed with useful information, names, geographical references, and other info. In the introduction, Rose reveals that material was drawn from a variety of sources: encyclopedias, dictionaries (of mythology), ancient and medieval texts, classic literature, folktales and folklore, chronicles and annals of historic events, fables, chapbooks, nursery rhymes, and surveys (genealogical, heraldic, anthropological, topographical). Way cool. It makes me want to have been there writing it with her. Then again, I’m a sucker for research projects … especially any that include ancient texts. YAY!

Reading it reminds me of watching the TV show, Charmed, or Hercules: The Legendary Journeys (the Robert Tapert/Sam Raimi version with Kevin Sorbo and Michael Hirst Hurst) – which is cool because I enjoy those shows. And there’s gorgeous artwork included, taken from a variety of sources, just to give your eyes a break from the text. It’s also easy-to-read and accessible, good for everyone.

It’s a big book and offers a little on everything, including monsters like Champ, a cryptid who is said to live in Lake Champlain between Québec, Canada and Vermont, USA. (A fun little tidbit for me, since I live in the province next door.) And I’m happy to see the likes of Grendel (and Grendel’s Mother) from the ancient tale Beowulf  included. Tolkien‘s Ents and Shelob are in it, too, along with Lewis Carroll‘s Jabberwocky!

In the back are a “Selected Bibliography” for further reference and Appendixes categorizing the beings, including “Beings associated with weather”, “Beings from literature”, “Heraldic beasts”, “Beings by country, realm, or people”, and a long list of others. Useful.

Though I think my favourite thing is how it touches on so many different areas of interest and subjects. History, anthropology, linguistics, geography, religion, spirituality, mythology, literature … it’s a little bit of a lot of things rolled up in one nice, pretty, neatly bound volume that fits well on any shelf without feeling like a brick. It has an international feel, taking the reader on a journey to peek inside all of the different human cultures. This book is one that ties us all together; for as different as we may seem, our monsters aren’t all that different. Dragons, giants, shifters, and similar creatures are everywhere! They might have different names but they share a lot in common. It’s a gentle reminder that while we fight each other and believe we’re completely different, we’re actually very much the same.

Now, I might be terribly biased because I fell in love with cryptozoology as a teenager, but I’d recommend this book to anyone – everyone – in the speculative fiction world who writes about creatures and beings, whether you pen fantasy, horror, paranormal, science fiction … whatever. You know, just in case you need a little help or inspiration. Or if you just like looking at the pictures and awesome names.